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Science

Science across all ages at Victoria Community School

Science Vision

At Victoria Community School, an enriched science curriculum that provides opportunities for practical lessons on a weekly basis is key. The children are exposed to a wide variety of topics that support the children’s curiosity for learning. Our curriculum aims to broaden the children’s scientific view of the world around them, whilst promoting a love for enquiry and wanting to explore new things.

 

At Victoria School we promote cross-curricular learning and the teaching of Science gives us many opportunities to promote learning across the curriculum including: cultural, social and moral development, numeracy and problem solving, literacy and thinking skills. We believe science encompasses the acquisition of knowledge, concepts, skills and positive attitudes. Through the National Curriculum programme of study our children will acquire and develop these skills throughout their Primary years.

The Science Curriculum

Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS)

In the EYFS, science is included within the Understanding the World area of learning. As with other learning in Reception, your child will mainly learn about science through games and play – which objects float and sink during water play, for example. Activities such as these will help your child to develop important skills such as observation, prediction and critical thinking.

Key Stage 1 (Years 1 and 2) and Key Stage 2 (Years 3-6)

The content of Science teaching and learning is set out in the 2014 National Curriculum for primary schools in England. Within this, certain topics and areas are repeated across year groups, meaning that children may revisit a particular topic in each year of primary school but with increasing difficulty and with a different focus each time.

For example, the area of animals, including humans is examined in every single year group, with a very clear progression of knowledge and understanding over the six years:
In Year 1 this involves: looking at the human body and labelling simple body parts such as; head, eyes, ears etc, recognising animal groups and sorting these animals.
By Year 6, this will have developed into knowing the internal structure of the human body in relation to circulation, classifying living things based on more complex characteristics and exploring scientific research into this classification.

The more detailed content for each year group is as follows:

Science Curriculum Coverage at Victoria Community School

Primary Science National Curriculum

In our Science Lessons

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Scientific Vocabulary

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Marking

Coming soon...

Assessment

Coming soon...

Monitoring

Coming soon...

Science Week 2021- 'Innovating for the future'

WATCH THIS SPACE INVENTORS...

Home/School links

A positive primary science experience is also key to encouraging future generations to not only study this at secondary school, but also potentially to follow it as a career.

 

How can I support my child in Science?

Be interested

Talk to your child and your child's class teacher about your child's termly topics. These can be found above on the 'curriculum overview'. 

Enjoy having the exciting conversations about what your child is learning. 

 

Take a trip

Why not take a trip to a science museum, a zoo or an aquarium? These don’t necessarily need to be completely related to what they are learning about at school. Any visit can help their curiosity and engagement with science generally.

 

Get hands-on

Look up fun, practical science experiments you can do at home with everyday objects.

For example:

  • Ask ‘What happens when you mix food colouring in milk?’ Then add washing up liquid and watch what happens.
  • Why not try making your own mini exploding volcano? Just add bicarbonate of soda, food colouring, washing up liquid and vinegar. Then stand back and watch the eruption!
  • Cooking is also a great opportunity to mix ingredients, add heat and examine changing states.
  • Try exploring changing states with ice and water to begin to see those changes that can be reversed and those that can’t.
  • A real favourite would have to be ‘gloop’ — use water and cornflour (add food colouring too if needed) to explore solids and liquids. Just be prepared to get messy!
  • Of course, there are also some wonderful science kits available to buy to push your scientists further – making crystals, rockets and even bouncy balls.

Anything where they can be hands-on and see the science happen in front of their eyes is guaranteed to be get them interested.

Games and Home Learning

Other good links...